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This month there has been a lot of talk in the news about the use of restraint on people with learning disabilities. This is because the BBC published a report on it and the findings were very shocking.

The BBC found that use of restraints on adults with learning disabilities increased 50% between 2016 and 2017. They also found that forms of restraint that were banned in 2014 are still being used a lot. For example, instances of face down or prone restraint increased from 2200 in 2016 to 3100 in 2017. These forms of restraint are bad and go against government guidelines because they can make it hard for people to breath. 

My Life My Choice agree with Liberal Democrat MP Norman Lamb, who introduced government guidelines to reduce restraint, that this is “absolutely shocking” and very demeaning. 

At My Life My Choice, we believe that people with learning disabilities should be treated equally to people who do not have disabilities. This means that they should not be restrained against their will unless they are breaking the law, and they should have the same rights and freedoms as the rest of the population. 

We are working very hard throughout Oxfordshire to improve care through our inspections and quality checkers work, but we know that there is still a long way to go until we achieve our goal of full equality. 

We are also campaigning to get people with learning disabilities out of long stay hospitals. The BBC found that the number of adults in inpatient units has decreased only a small amount and the number of children in such units has almost doubled. You can watch our ‘Don’t Lock Us Away’ campaign video here.

To get involved with My Life My Choice’s campaigns, come along to our champions monthly meeting – this month the meeting will be from 1pm -3pm on Tuesday 30th October at our offices in the Jam Factor, Oxford. 

You can also read more about the BBC’s findings here: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-45652339

My Life My Choice is registered in England under charity number 1073247 at The Jam Factory, 27 Park End Street, Oxford. We use cookies to improve your experience using this website. To learn more, read our privacy policy.
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